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Association Letters

  /    /  Association Letters

July 22, [1921] [Postcard] from Grace Hegger Lewis in Cornwall to Dr. and Mrs. Whedon, West Chester, Penn.
“A quiet July in beautiful Cornwall. And then an Elizabethan house in Kent. We hope all goes well with you / The Sinclair Lewises”

Nov. 8, 1930 from H.L. Mencken in Baltimore to [unidentified]
Recipient’s name blacked out. Mencken writes: “The award of the Nobel Prize to Sinclair Lewis gave me immense pleasure. I can imagine no man whose recognition would be more offensive to the general run of American literary patriots. It was a blow exactly in the eye …”

Jan. 1, 1931 from Dorothy Thompson to Art Young
She is enclosing a check; “pick out the silver loving cup for yourself.”

Jan. 2, 1935 from Dorothy Thompson to Margaret Banning, Duluth
“It does not happen very often in my life that I meet…a fellow spirit and feel that I have really made a new friend…”

Nov. 3, 1937 from Dorothy Thompson to Robert Gessner, New York University
She will recommend him for a Guggenheim Fellowship. “My little boy wrote you a letter in his own hand thanking you for the soldiers which delighted his heart, but I didn’t know where to reach you …”

April 19, 1938 from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
Thompson comments on her hate mail, and repeats her son’s remark on Mussolini: “Michael is seven and a half. I was reading the headlines aloud broodingly, and said ‘Well, I see that Mussolini has nine million men mobilized and ready to fight!’ To which Michael repied: ‘I know that kind of talk. I say I say I have got a hundred boys in my gang, but I have only got two friends.’”

Jan. 6, 1939 from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
“I have known Cockburn for years. He is a brilliant journalist but not at all reliable.”

Jan. 31, 1940 from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
Thompson discusses English politics, the occupation of Poland, and Swedish aid to Finland.

Oct. 20, 1940 from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
Thompson comments on Wolcott Gibbs in The New Yorker: “It is nice to know that the Talk of the Town is not the opinion either of the town or of the fellows who write it, but only of the publishers …”

Nov. 19, [1940?] from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
She is outraged that Winchell reported on her supposed ambition to be ambassador to Germany after the war: “Don’t you give a damn whether you lie or not?”

Dec. 3, [1940?] from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
Thompson comments on being misquoted after telling a story about Churchill at a party: “If one can’t go to parties, furthermore, without having what one says … rushed into print … how can anyone lead a half-way normal life.”

[1942-1943]
Collection of 4 typed letters to Arthur Goldsmith, concerning her work on behalf of the Volunteer Land Corps, a wartime organization for young people, in which she hoped he would be interested.

April 30, 1944 from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
She explains her position on the case of Paul Scheffer.

March 12, 1946 from Hilda Auersperg, secretary to Dorothy Thompson, to Walter Winchell
Thompson appreciates his “friendly comment.”

Nov. 3, 1946 from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
Thompson comments on her relations with Paul Scheffer, and would like to tell him the story “eye to eye.”

March 27, 1947 from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
“Berlin was never a Nazi town.”

March 31, 1947 Memorandum to Winchell from his staff
Winchell is supplied with statistics with which to reply to Thompson’s previous letter.

April 24, 1937 [i.e. 1947] from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
Thompson disagrees with his statistics, and re-states her position.

Dec. [194-?] from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
She encloses an excerpt from the “Schwarze Korps” official newspaper on German-Americans; “the racial structure of America is refuse.”

July 7, 1948 from Dorothy Thompson to Gertrude
On her room accommodations for the Democratic National Convention; “from this distance everything seems like an unholy mess.”

Dec. 26, 1952 from Dorothy Thompson to Walter Winchell
Thompson comments on the Rosenberg case, and encloses a copy of her column on the Rosenbergs.