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Periodicals

  /    /  Periodicals

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXI, no. II — (Nov. 1905)
— Includes Lewis’s short story “The Loneliness of Theodore,” signed “Harry S. Lewis.”

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXI, no. IV — (Jan. 1906)
— Includes a short article by Harry S. Lewis entitled “The Heart of Pope Innocent.”

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXI, no. VII — (April 1906)
— Lewis is listed as an editor; he is also credited as the author of an introductory paragraph entitled “Editor’s Table.”

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXI, no. VIII — (May 1906)
— “Harry S. Lewis” is again listed as an editor and the author of “Editor’s Table.”

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXI, no. IX — (June 1906)
— Includes “Unknown Undergraduates,” by Harry S. Lewis, as well as “Editor’s Table.”

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXII, no. I — (Oct. 1906)
— Lewis is again listed as an editor.

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXII, no. II — (Nov. 1906)
— Lewis is listed as an editor, and has written “Editor’s Table.”

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXII, no. III — (Dec. 1906)
— Lewis is listed as an editor, and has contributed “Editor’s Table” as well as “In Praise of South Middle,” an appreciation of a building at Yale later known as Connecticut Hall.

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXII, no. IV — (Jan. 1907)
— Lewis is listed as an editor, and has written “Editor’s Table.”

Yale Literary Magazine — vol. LXXII, no. VI — (March 1907)
— Lewis is listed as an editor, and has contributed a poem entitled “A Rondeau of Farewell.”

Book News Monthly — vol. 25, no. 8 (April 1907) — vol. 27, no. 3 (Nov. 1908)
— 15 issues in homemade binding, inscribed “Frieda / from Mother”
— Sept. 1907 issue includes Lewis’s poem “To William Butler Yeats.”

The Smart Set — vol. 22, no. 4 — (August 1907)
— Includes Lewis’s poem “Dim Hour of Dusk.”

The Nautilus — vol. XII, no. 7 — (May 1910)
— Includes one installment (chapters 10 and 11) of Lewis’s “The City Shadow.”

Saturday Evening Post — vol. 189, no. 16 — (Oct. 4, 1916)
— Includes Lewis’s short story “Honestly if Possible.”

Harper’s — no. 850 — (March 1921)
— Includes Lewis’s short story “A Matter of Business,” illustrated by Wallace Morgan.

American Magazine — vol. XCI, no. 4 — (April 1921)
— Includes Lewis’s “How I Wrote a Novel on Trains and beside the Kitchen Sink,” in which he recalls working on The Trail of the Hawk while living in Port Washington.

Nation — vol. CXVII, No. 3074 — (June 4, 1924)
— Includes Lewis’s essay “I Return to America.”

The American Mercury — vol. IV, no. 15 — (March 1925)
— Includes an advertisement for Arrowsmith: “It will be the most important book of 1925.”

The American Mercury — vol. IV, no. 16 — (April 1925)
— Includes a review of Arrowsmith: “Once the thing gets under way — and it gets under way toward the bottom of the first page — it thunders on in a straight line to an inescapable conclusion.”

Literary Digest International Book Review — vol. III, no. 5 — (April 1925)
— Includes a review of Lewis’s Arrowsmith by Joseph Collins entitled “Sinclair Lewis Diagnoses the Doctors.”

The American Mercury — vol. V, no. 17 — (May 1925)
— With a caricature of Lewis in an advertisement for The Nation: “Sinclair Lewis, who is a authority on traces of civilization in the United States, says there are two magazines worth reading … One you hold in your hand at his moment. The other — The Nation — we have arranged for you to get as painlessly as possible…”

The American Mercury — vol. VI, no. 22 — (Oct. 1925)
— Includes Lewis’s essay “Self-conscious America.”

Literary Digest International Book Review — vol. IV, no. 8 — (July 1926)
— Includes a review of Lewis’s Mantrap by William Lyon Phelps, entitled “Sinclair Lewis takes a Holiday in Canada.”

The American Mercury — vol. VIII, no. 32 — (Aug. 1926)
— Includes a review of Mantrap: “Lewis…sets before us only a herd of stuffed dummies. They are never real for an instant.”

Haldeman-Julius Quarterly — vol. I, no. 1 — (Oct. 1926)
— Includes an article by Marcet Haldeman-Julius entitled “Sinclair Lewis and a Liberal Preacher.”

Haldeman-Julius Monthly — vol. IV, no. 6 — (Nov. 1926)
— Includes “The Babbitts’ Utopia” by Oscar Lewis and “The Babbitts of Radicalism” by Benjamin de Casseres.

The American Mercury — vol. X, no. 40 — (April 1927)
— Includes a review of Elmer Gantry: “For the third time Lewis knocks one clear over the fence.”

The American Mercury — vol. XI, no. 41 — (May 1927)
— Includes an article entitled “George Sterling at Carmel” by Mary Austin, in which Lewis is mentioned as a member of the Carmel colony.

The American Mercury — vol. XII, no. 48 — (Dec. 1927)
— Includes an article entitled “The Vulgate in American Fiction” by Wallace Rice, which makes reference to Lewis’s use of language in Elmer Gantry.

The American Mercury — vol. XIII, no. 49 — (Jan. 1928)
— Includes an excerpt from The Man who Knew Coolidge.

The American Mercury — vol. XIV, no. 54 — (June 1928)
— Includes a review of The Man who Knew Coolidge: “Now that Lewis has filled a gallery with his Babbitts and his Vergil Gunches … it is easy for idiot reviewers to argue that they are all caricatures…In the whole history of the science of criticism there is no record of a more absurd error.”

Life and Letters — vol. II, no. 12 — (May 1929)
— Includes “A Camera Man” by E.M. Forster, an essay on the realism of Lewis’s novels.

[Advertising Sheet for] Contempo : A Review of Books and Personalities (193?)
— Includes “Comments Concerning ‘Contempo.’” Lewis’s comment reads: “You are not on the way to ‘success’ until the newspapers have called you nuts, cranks, and liars.”

Harkness Hoot — vol. 1, no. 1 — (Oct. 1, 1930)
— Lewis is mentioned in an article on emerging literary trends entitled “Twenty or Over,” by William Harlan Hale.

Harkness Hoot — vol. 1, no. 2 — (Nov. 15, 1930)
— Includes an article on the Benets, Lewis’s longtime associates.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. VII, no. 18 — (Nov. 22, 1930)
— Includes an article on Lewis and the Nobel Prize.

Harkness Hoot — vol. I, no. 3 — (Jan. 1, 1931)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis: A Prize Essay” by E.V. Rostow and “Sinclair Lewis: A Reply” by Selden Rodman.

Harkness Hoot — vol. 1, no. 5-6 — (Apr.-May 1931)
— Includes a brief comment by Lewis entitled “Are Colleges Obsolete?” Saturday Review of Literature — vol. VII, no. 43 — (May 16, 1931)
— Includes “A list of Sinclair Lewis’s Early Books.”

The Strand Magazine — vol. LXXXII, no. 489 — (Sept. 1931)
— Includes Lewis’s short story “Pyjamas,” illustrated by Gilbert Wilkinson.

Contempo — vol. IV, no. 1 — (April 5, 1933)
— Includes Lewis’s “A Note from Austria.”

Contempo — vol. IV, no. 2 — (May 15, 1933)
— Includes Lewis’s “Ann Vickers’s Literary Drunk.”

Golden Book Magazine — vol. XVIII, no. 103 — (July 1933)
— Includes Lewis’s short story “Speed.”

Modern Monthly — vol. VIII, no. 2 — (March 1934)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis: The Last of the Literary Liberals” by V.F. Calverton.

Scribner’s — vol. XCVIII, no. 2 — (August 1935)
— Includes Lewis’s “Onward, Sons of Ingersoll : A story.”

Vanity Fair — vol. 45, no. 45 — (Oct. 1935)
— Includes Lewis’s response to the “Permanent Literary Questionnaire.”

New Masses — vol. XVII, no. 5 — (Oct. 29, 1935)
— Includes a review of It Can’t Happen Here by Granville Hicks entitled “Sinclair Lewis, Anti-Fascist.”

New Masses — vol. XVII, no. 12 — (Dec. 17, 1935)
— Includes Lewis’s prayer “Christmas, 1935.”

New Masses — vol. XVIII, no. 3 — (Jan. 14, 1936)
— Includes an interview with Lewis by Jack Wilgus, entitled “Sinclair Lewis Visits a Strike.” The workers at the Vermont Marble Company in Rutland were on strike, and Lewis became involved as an observer.

Yale Literary Magazine — Centennial number — (Feb. 1936)
— Includes Lewis’s essay “Rambling Thoughts on Literature as a Business,” in which he advises the young writer to learn “a dual profession … to touch some non-literary world …”

[Another copy]

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XIV, no. 23 — (Oct. 3, 1936)
— Includes Lewis’s humorous essay “Literary Felonies.”

Federal Theatre: Bulletin of the Federal Theatre Project — vol. 2, no. 2 — (Dec. 1936)
— Includes a series of articles on “the simultaneous production in 15 cities of It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis.” A list of the productions appears on p. [7]

Avocations — vol. 1, no. 1 — (Oct. 1937)
— Includes “Why not Collect Books?” by Frederick B. Adams, Jr., in which Lewis’s popularity is mentioned.

Colophon, new series — vol. II, no. 4 — (Autumn 1937)
— Includes an article by Kenneth A. Fowler entitled “This Praise is not Folly,” in which Lewis is mentioned at length.

Colophon, new series — vol. II, no. 2 — (Winter 1937)
— Includes Lewis’s “Breaking into Print.”

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XVII, no. 13 — (Jan. 22, 1938)
— Includes a review of Lewis’s The Prodigal Parents by Elmer Davis.

Story — vol. XII, no. 68 — (March 1938)
— Includes an essay on Lewis by Lewis Gannett, entitled “Behind the Books.”

Life — vol. 5, no. 6 — (Aug. 8, 1938)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis Acts in his own Play,” an article on Lewis’s portrayal of Doremus Jessup in the 1938 production of It Can’t Happen Here by the Cohasset, Massachusetts summer players.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XIX, no. 15 — (Feb. 4, 1939)
— Includes an excerpt from Leonard Bacon’s autobiography, Semi-Centennial, entitled “Yale ’09.” Bacon reminisces about Lewis’s years at Yale.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XIX, no. 23 — (Apr. 1, 1939)
— Includes “William Lyon Phelps” by Lewis, a tribute to his former English professor at Yale.

Story — vol. XV, no. 78 — (July – August 1939)
— Includes a comment by Lewis on Meridel LeSueur’s “The Horse”: “It has distinction … in its originality.”

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXVII, no. 15 — (Apr. 8, 1944)
— Includes Bernard De Voto’s “They Turned their Backs on America,” an essay on the writers of the 1920s.

Esquire — vol. XXIV, no. 4 — (Oct. 1945)
— Includes “The Boxers of M. Voltaire” by Lewis.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXVIII, no. 40 — (Oct. 6, 1945)
— Includes a review of Lewis’s Cass Timberlane by Mary M. Colum.

Time — vol. XLVI, no. 15 — (Oct. 8, 1945)
— Includes an unsigned article on Lewis entitled “Laureate of the Booboisie.” There is a portrait of Lewis on the cover, surrounded by books and money.

New Masses — vol. LVII, no. 5 — (Oct. 30, 1945)
— Includes a review of Lewis’s Cass Timberlane by Dorothy Brewster, entitled “Sinclair Lewis on Marriage.”

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXX, no. 21 — (May 24, 1947)
— Includes a review of Lewis’s Kingsblood Royal by Clifton Fadiman, and a brief biographical sketch of Lewis.

Wings: The Literary Guild Review (June 1947)
— Includes material about Lewis’s Kingsblood Royal, the June 1947 Literary Guild selection.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXX, no. 44 — (Nov. 1, 1947)
— Includes “Diarist of the Middle-class Mind” by Maxwell Geismar, an essay on Lewis condensed from his The Last of the Provincials (1947)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis gets the Job” by W.E. Woodward, an excerpt from his autobiography, The Gift of Life, in which he recalls offering Lewis a job in advertising.

The Pacific Spectator — vol. 1, no. 1 — (Winter 1947)
— Includes “The Sick American Novel” by S.K. Winther.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXXI, no. 49 — (Dec. 4, 1948)
— Includes an interview with Lewis by Sylvia Richmond.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXXII, no. 11 — (March 12, 1949)
— Includes a review of Lewis’s The God-Seeker by Howard Mumford Jones.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXXII, no. 32 — (Aug. 6, 1949)
— 25th anniversary issue.
— Includes a reappraisal of Lewis’s Main Street by Lewis Gannett, and an article by Roger Butterfield entitled “From Babbitt to the Bomb.”

Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Second Series. No. 1 (1951) – No. 5 (1955).
— Bound cumulation of 5 annual volumes.
— Includes “Literary Exercises at the Opening of the Exhibition in Honor of Sinclair Lewis, Feb. 1, 1952”; “Sinclair Lewis, a Few Reminiscences,” by Chauncey B. Tinker; “Sinclair Lewis and the ‘Labor Novel’” by Ramon Guthrie.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXXIV, no. 3 — (Jan. 20, 1951)
— Includes a report of Lewis’s death.

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXXIV, no. 4 — (Jan. 27, 1951)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis : Remembrance of the Past” by Harrison Smith.

New Republic — vol. 124, no. 5 — (Jan. 29, 1951)
— Includes “Romance and Mr. Babbitt” by Gerald W. Johnson.

Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine — vol. 17, no. 88 — (March 1951)
— Includes Lewis’s short story “The Post-mortem Murder.”

Saturday Review of Literature — vol. XXXIV, no. 9 — (Mar. 3, 1951)
— Includes a letter to the editor by Harold Kastner expressing his sorrow at Lewis’s death.

Saturday Review — vol. XXXV, no. 46 — (Nov. 15, 1952)
— Includes a review by Maxwell Geismar of From Main Street to Stockholm, a collection of Lewis’s letters. The review is entitled “A Puritan for All.”

Saturday Review — vol. XXXV, no. 52 — (Dec. 27, 1952)
— Includes a year-end review of literature in which From Main Street to Stockholm is mentioned.

Saturday Review — vol. XXXVI, no. 27 — (July 4, 1953)
— Includes “Books that Changed America” by Eric F. Goldman, in which Babbitt is mentioned.

Saturday Review — vol. XXXVIII, no. 23 — (June 4, 1955)
— Includes Lewis’s “The Wash-tub Sea,” a poem which first appeared in the November 1906 issue of Youth, a children’s magazine published in Philadelphia from 1902-1907.

Saturday Review — vol. XXXVIII, no. 51 — (Dec. 17, 1955)
— Includes “Main Street Comes into the Home,” by Norman Cousins, a re-appraisal of the book on the 35th anniversary of its publication.

Venture — vol. 2, no. 2 — (Summer 1956)
— Includes Part I of “A Village Radical Goes Home” by Betty Stevens, a reminiscence of her friendship with Lewis in the late 1940s.

Venture — vol. 2, no. 3 — (Winter 1957)
— The continuation of “A Village Radical Goes Home.”

Esquire — vol. L, no. 4 — (Oct. 1958)
— 25th anniversary issue.
— Includes Lewis’s “Minnesota Diary,” excerpts from his journals, selected and introduced by Mark Schorer.

Carleton Miscellany — vol. 1, no. 2 — (Spring 1960)
— Includes “A Letter from Sauk Centre” by Peter Brand, an account of the author’s attendance at a service commemorating the 75th anniversary of Lewis’s birth.

Saturday Review — vol. XLIII, no. 26 — (June 25, 1960)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis : Forgotten Hero” by Maxwell Geismar, an essay on the decline of Lewis’s critical reputation.
— Includes a review of the film version of Elmer Gantry.

American Heritage — vol. XII, no. 6 — (Oct. 1961)
— Includes a lengthy essay on Lewis’s Main Street by Mark Schorer.

Twentieth Century Literature — vol. 9, no. 4 — (Jan. 1964)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis and Floyd Dell: Two Views of the Midwest” by G. Thomas Tanselle, a comparison of Lewis’s Main Street and Dell’s Moon-Calf.

Horizon — vol. 22, no. 3 — (March 1979)
— Includes “A Portrait of Sinclair Lewis” by Barnaby Conrad. A related, unsigned article mentions the opening of a play based on Lewis’s life with Dorothy Thompson. Sherman Yellen’s “Strangers” starred Bruce Dern and Lois Nettleton.

[Horizon — Dec. 1980]
— Barnaby Conrad’s proof sheets of his article entitled “Genius and Intemperance,” a lengthy discussion of the drinking habits of American authors.

MidAmerica: The Yearbook of the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature — no. 8 — 1981)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis and the Nobel Prize” by David D. Anderson.

MidAmerica: The Yearbook of the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature — no. 9 — (1982)
— Includes “Sinclair Lewis vs. Zane Grey: Mantrap as Satirical Western” by Robert E. Fleming.

New Yorker — vol. LXII, no. 33 — (Oct. 5, 1987)
— Includes “Policing America’s Writers” by Herbert Mitgang, in which Lewis is mentioned.

Vanity Fair — vol. 53, no. 5 — (May 1990)
— Includes an excerpt from Peter Kurth’s book about Dorothy Thompson, American Cassandra, in which Lewis is mentioned at length.